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VICTORIA, BC (September 15, 2018) I’m pleased to announce my artwork will be featured by Fazakas Gallery at Art Toronto 2018, Canada’s international fair for modern and contemporary art.

Art Toronto
Metro Toronto Convention Centre
255 Front St W, Toronto, ON M5V 2W6
October 26-28, 2018
Fazakas Booth: VERGE C8
www.arttoronto.ca

The Eastern Grey Squirrel has excellent dichromatic colour vision that is mediated by green and blue cones. A sample of my latest work at Art Toronto 2018 simulates the colour vision of the Grey Squirrel, and examines the dual-subjective reality of our senses to better imagine their worldview. I believe we can come to know someone else through experience, which can promote new forms of cohabitation.  I will have dichromatic spectacles at Art Toronto 2018 for booth visitors to engage in an interactive experience.

Carollyne Yardley testing dichromatic spectacles, image saved as RGB/8/Protanopia type Photoshop CC. 2018.

Carollyne Yardley testing dichromatic spectacles, image saved as Protanopia type.  2018.

About the Artworks

It is estimated a typical human eye can detect hundreds of different colours. But 23 million years ago our primate ancestors were red-green colour blind. So how did we come to have the rich colour vision we have today? Most mammals including squirrels are red-green colour blind.

Grey Squirrels have excellent dichromatic colour vision that is mediated by green and blue cones (Hooser, Stephen & Nelson, Sacha 2006). In dichromatic animals, retinas are composed of either S- and M-cones (protanope) or S- and L-cones (deuteranope). Researchers at the Eye Institute of the University of Washington behaviorally tested animals to demonstrate the ability to discriminate blues and yellows, whereas greens and reds are indistinguishable from gray.

So why can’t squirrels see red? Squirrel eyes, like all eyes, rely on special proteins called opsins (a protein that forms part of the visual pigment rhodopsin and is released by the action of light) to detect colour. They are held in thousands of special cells in the retina at the back of the eye. Squirrels have two types of opsins each tuned to specific wavelengths of light. Signals from these opsins are then interpreted by the brain, which allows squirrels to perceive colour. But to see colour like humans do, squirrels need a third opsin tuned to different wavelengths of light. 

It is possible our early ancestors were like squirrels, and they had just two opsins as well.  So how did we evolve a third opsin?  According to researchers, the answer is in our DNA. Each opsin is encoded by a single gene. And when scientists compared the genes, they found that the gene for the newer opsin sits right next to one of the old ones. And significantly, they are incredibly similar. Both halfs have tell tale clues as to how the extra gene evolved. The old opsin gene was duplicated. And over many generations one of these copies acquired small mutations that allowed it to detect different wavelengths of light. These mutations would have helped us by increasing the ability to pick out ripe fruits and leaves that are the most nutritious, and a better capability to survive.

Cypher Squirrel, Oil on panel, 36” diameter, 2018.

Cypher Squirrel, Oil on panel, 36” diameter, 2018.

About the Artist


Carollyne Yardley
is an inter-disciplinary artist, speculative designer, and squirrel lover. Her artistic practise is driven by research into the changing role that nature plays in urban space, the interconnections between humans and non-humans within a shared urban landscape, and the opportunities to better organize our environments that de-centres the human in the design. With increased urbanization, cohabitation between humans and non-humans is inevitable. Humans living in urban spaces experience daily interconnections with non-humans and we need to get comfortable with the idea of sharing space with our four-legged and winged neighbours as cities spread out further into the natural landscape.

Yardley’s body of work visually interprets a cross species dialogue by translating the visual, sonic, gestural, and social data she’s collected by observing the free range Grey Squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) in her urban garden. After she rescued a dying squirrel in her yard, Yardley was compelled to create portraits of hybrid-humans in an effort to break down the barrier between humans and non-humans to create dialogue – and thus, Squirrealism was born. 

Squirrealism is a self-coined term used to propose a symbiogenesis of sorts, where our lives and other species biologically, culturally and politically intersect. 

Yardley invented her imaginary hybrid-humans to represent a non-hierarchical, non-binary consideration of being, a recognition of “we” in the evolution of universal consciousness, and our shared interconnected subconscious with all living matter. The objective of her work is not concerned with assimilation of animals as humans, but with a levelling of hierarchy.

The Eastern Grey Squirrel has excellent dichromatic colour vision that is mediated by green and blue cones. A sample of  Yardley’s latest work simulates the colour vision of the Grey Squirrel, and examines the dual-subjective reality of our senses to better imagine their worldview. Yardley believes we can come to know someone else through experience, which can promote new forms of cohabitation.

Cyber Squirrel, oil on panel, 30" diameter, 2018

Cyber Squirrel, oil on panel, 30″ diameter, 2018

 

Cyberella One, oil on panel, 15" diameter, 2018

Cyberella One, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018

 

Cyberella Two, oil on panel, 15" diameter, 2018

Cyberella Two, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018

 

mtSQRL Blue, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018.

mtSQRL Blue, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018.

mtSQRL Pink, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018.

mtSQRL Pink, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018.

mtSQRL Yellow, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018.

mtSQRL Yellow, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018.

mtSQRL Data, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018.

mtSQRL Data, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018.

 

mtSQRL Bionic, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018.

mtSQRL Bionic, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018.

 

How A Squirrel Sees, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018.

How A Squirrel Sees, oil on panel, 15″ diameter, 2018.


 

 

 

 

Announcing the Exhibitor List for Art Toronto 2018

Art Toronto, Canada’s international fair for modern and contemporary art, returns for its 19th annual edition presenting 102 exhibitors from 7 countries and 28 cities. Launching with Opening Night, a benefit gala for the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO), on October 25, Art Toronto runs from October 26-29, 2018 at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. The fair will be organized in following sections: MAIN, SOLO, VERGE, FOCUS and ARTS & CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS.

This year, Art Toronto welcomes new galleries including Chimento Contemporary (Los Angeles), DNA Gallery (London), GOLESTANI (Dusseldorf), Hosfelt Gallery (San Francisco), Casemore Kirkeby (San Francisco), Axel Pairon Gallery (Knokke), Project Gallery (Toronto), Projet Pangée(Montreal) and VIVIANEART (Calgary).

 

/MAIN

Premier modern and contemporary galleries from Canada, the United States, Germany, United Kingdom, Israel and Belgium.

Sandra Ainsley Gallery (Toronto)
Angell Gallery (Toronto)
Art Mûr (Berlin, Montreal)
Bau-Xi Gallery & Bau-Xi Photo (Toronto)
Galerie de Bellefeuille Inc. (Montreal, Toronto)
Galeries Roger Bellemare et Christian Lambert (Montreal)
Galerie Jean-Claude Bergeron (Ottawa)
Galerie Simon Blais (Montreal)
Galerie René Blouin (Montreal)
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau (Montreal)
Monte Clark Gallery (Vancouver)
COOPER COLE (Toronto)
Corkin Gallery Inc. (Toronto)
Cosner Gallery at the Ritz-Carlton Montreal (Montreal)
Christopher Cutts Gallery (Toronto)
Galerie D’Este (Montreal)
Galerie Division (Montreal, Toronto)
Downs & Ross (New York)
Anat Ebgi (Los Angeles)
Barbara Edwards Contemporary (Toronto)
Susan Eley Fine Art (New York)
ELLEPHANT (Montreal)
Equinox Gallery (Vancouver)
Galerie Antoine Ertaskiran (Montreal)
Daniel Faria Gallery (Toronto)
Feheley Fine Arts (Toronto)
Franc Gallery (Vancouver)
Galerie 3 (Quebec City)
General Hardware Contemporary (Toronto)
Jill George Gallery (London)
Michael Gibson Gallery (London)
Mira Godard Gallery (Toronto)
GOLESTANI (Dusseldorf)
Han Art (Montreal)
Susan Hobbs Gallery (Toronto)
Hosfelt Gallery (San Francisco)
Rebecca Hossack Art Gallery (London, New York)
renann isaacs contemporary art (Guelph)
Catriona Jeffries (Vancouver)
Gallery Jones (Vancouver)
Olga Korper Gallery (Toronto)
Galerie Claude Lafitte (Montreal)
Galerie Laroche/Joncas (Montreal)
GALERIE ISABELLE LESMEISTER (Regensburg)
Masters Gallery (Calgary)
Mayberry Fine Art (Toronto, Winnipeg)
Todd Merrill Studio (New York)
Nicholas Metivier Gallery (Toronto)
MKG127 (Toronto)
Oeno Gallery (Bloomfield)
Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain (Montreal, Toronto)
Parisian Laundry (Montreal)
Christina Parker Gallery (St. John’s)
Paul Petro Contemporary Art (Toronto)
Project Gallery (Toronto)
PSM (Berlin)
Galerie Raphael (Frankfurt)
Galerie Nicolas Robert (Montreal)
Roberts Gallery (Toronto)
RoFa Projects (Potomac)
Nikola Rukaj Gallery (Toronto)
Rumi Galleries (Oakville)
Georgia Scherman Projects (Toronto)
Miriam Shiell Fine Art (Toronto)
Jessica Silverman Gallery (San Francisco)
Slate Fine Art Gallery (Regina)
Studio 21 Fine Art (Halifax)
TrépanierBaer Gallery (Calgary)
Galerie Trois Points (Montreal)
Galerie Van Der Planken (Antwerp)
Odon Wagner Contemporary (Toronto)
Winchester Galleries (Victoria)
Dianna Witte Gallery (Toronto)
Zemack Contemporary Art (Tel Aviv)

 

/SOLO

Galleries representing a highly-curated body of work by a single artist.

Birch Contemporary (Toronto): Micah Lexier
Galerie Simon Blais (Montreal): Louis-Philippe Côté
Stephen Bulger Gallery & Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain (Montreal, Toronto): Meryl McMaster
Mark Christopher Gallery (Toronto): Mark Puchala
Galerie D’Este (Montreal): Véronique La Perrière M.
Jarvis Hall Gallery (Calgary): Tyler Los-Jones
Macaulay & Co. Fine Art (Vancouver): Shawn Hunt
Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain (Montreal, Toronto): Dil Hildebrand
Axel Pairon Gallery (Knokke): Regine Schumann
Project Gallery (Toronto): Tessar Lo
TrépanierBaer Gallery (Calgary): Ryan Sluggett
VIVIANEART (Calgary): Tyler Bright Hilton

 

/VERGE

Dedicated to galleries that have been in business for eight years or less, presenting work by young and emerging artists made in the past five years.

La Castiglione Gallery (Montreal)
DNA Gallery (London)
Fazakas Gallery (Vancouver)
Franz Kaka (Toronto)
Lisa Kehler Art + Projects (Winnipeg)
Projet Pangée (Montreal)
Quimera (Buenos Aires)
Zalucky Contemporary (Toronto)

 

/FOCUS

Expanding upon 2017’s FOCUS on Los Angeles, Art Toronto returns this year with FOCUS: California. The interactive exhibit featuring galleries from California will be curated by Kim Nguyen(Curator and Head of Programs at the CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco) and Glen Helfand(Associate Professor at California College of the Arts, San Francisco, independent writer and curator based in Oakland, California). More details will be announced this summer.

Chimento Contemporary (Los Angeles)
Colpa Press (San Francisco)
CULT | Aimee Friberg Exhibitions (San Francisco)
Electric Works (San Francisco)
Et al. (San Francisco)
Exploratorium (San Francisco)
Charlie James Gallery (Los Angeles)
Casemore Kirkeby (San Francisco)
Gregory Lind Gallery (San Francisco)
Luis De Jesus Los Angeles (Los Angeles)
Night Gallery (Los Angeles)
Royale Projects (Los Angeles)

 

/ARTS & CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS

Art Dealers Association of Canada (ADAC) (Toronto)
Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) (Toronto)
Border Crossings Magazine (Winnipeg)
Canadian Art Magazine (Toronto)
Inuit Art Foundation (Toronto)
McMichael Canadian Art Collection (Kleinburg)
Museum of Contemporary Art Toronto Canada (MOCA) (Toronto)
OCAD University (Toronto)
The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery (Toronto)
RBC Canadian Painting Competition (Toronto)
Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival (Toronto)
Toronto Biennial of Art (Toronto)

Art Toronto is welcomes the return of RBC as the fair’s Presenting Sponsor, AXA Art Insurance as Show Sponsor, Mindham Fine Jewellery as Supporting Sponsor; and the AGO and Canadian Art as Lead Partners.