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Guerrilla Squirrel: Guerrilla Girls, Pussy Galore, Wonder Woman, and Gloria Steinem

Guerrilla Squirrel, oil on wood panel, 40 x 40, 2015 (after Guerrilla Girls' and Pussy Galore)

Guerrilla Squirrel, oil on wood panel, 40 x 40, 2015 (after Guerrilla Girls’ and Pussy Galore)

Carollyne Yardley working on Guerrilla Squirrel. In the studio.

Carollyne Yardley working on Guerrilla Squirrel. In the studio.

Guerilla Squirrel, detail

Guerilla Squirrel, detail.

Guerrilla Squirrel, detail.

Guerrilla Squirrel, detail.

Guerrilla Squirrel, detail.

Guerrilla Squirrel, detail.

Guerrilla Squirrel, detail.

Guerrilla Squirrel, detail.

Event: “SHE”
Opening Reception: Saturday May 23th 6pm – 8pm
Exhibition Dates: May 23th – June 20th
Venue: Fazakas Gallery, 145 West 6th Avenue, Vancouver
Gallery Hours: 11 am – 5 pm Tuesday to Saturday
Information: www.fazakasgallery.com

FULL SHOW DETAILS HERE

This is one of my new works appearing in this upcoming group show.  The theme of SHE, Fazakas Gallery, is about diversity in feminism. FULL SHOW DETAILS HERE.

In order to remind myself of the WORD, I downloaded a copy of Gloria Steinem’s, Outrageous Acts, and Everyday Rebellions and re-read the Guerrilla Girls’, Beside Companion to the History of Western Art, and ART MUSEUM Activity Book.

Gloria Steinem and Guerrilla Girls' books

Gloria Steinem and Guerrilla Girls’ books

Happy 30th Anniversary to the Guerrilla Girls’!

Since 1985, the Guerrilla Girls’, an anonymous collective of female artists and art-world professionals, have used gorilla masks, glue brushes, and acidly satiric posters to prove that humour (and fake fur) can illuminate and educate the art community to the sexism, racism and inequality in the art world. (4)  The Guerrilla Girls’ 1986 Report Card tallied the number of women represented by top New York galleries at the time.

Curator Maura Reilly posted an image of gallery gender statistics in February 2015. It was Pussy Galore’s 2015 Report Card by the Feminist Art Collective showing the percentages of women represented by some of the top art galleries in New York City today. The two images are below for comparison. The new tally shows sexism is still alive and well at top NYC galleries.

Guerrilla Girls 1986 Report Card and Pussy Galore 2015 Report Card. Imageby Maura Reilly

Guerrilla Girls 1986 Report Card and Pussy Galore 2015 Report Card. Imageby Maura Reilly

In planning the painting, Guerrilla Squirrel, my use of the squirrel mask (by Archie McPhee), and its metaphor for secrets was a perfect parallel to the GGs’ gorilla mask of anonymity.

The Guerrilla Girls’ website reads, “We’re feminist masked avengers in the tradition of anonymous do-gooders like Robin Hood, Wonder Woman and Batman. How do we expose sexism, racism and corruption in politics, art, film and pop culture?”

The mention of Wonder Woman made me think of a book I bought years ago at a years sale. Wonder Woman, A Ms. Book Published by Holt, Rinehart and Winston and Warner Books, 1972. I pulled it out to keep the stream of ideas flowing. Low and behold, the book has an introduction by Gloria Steinem / interpretive Essay by Phyllis Chesler, and designed by Bea Feitler. Additionally, each of the four sections of comics: Origins, Sisterhood, Politics, and Romance, have a preface by Gloria Steinem.

Wonder Woman, Introduction by Gloria Steinem / Interpretive Essay by Phyllis Chesler, and designed by Bea Feitler. A Ms. Book Published by Holt, Rinehart and Winston and Warner Books. 1972.

Wonder Woman, Introduction by Gloria Steinem / Interpretive Essay by Phyllis Chesler, and designed by Bea Feitler. A Ms. Book Published by Holt, Rinehart and Winston and Warner Books. 1972.

Did I mention that I’ve owned and operated a Wonder Woman costume ever since 1977?

Found my first Wonder Woman costume. My mum made it for me when I was about seven? Because I *WAS* LINDA CARTER. #wonderwoman #1970's

Found my first Wonder Woman costume. My mum made it for me when I was about seven? Because I *WAS* LINDA CARTER. #wonderwoman #1970’s

It’s a lot or work, ya know.

Next up was asking permission from the Guerrilla Girls’ and Pussy Galore (both located in NYC) to use the Report Cards in a painting. I first emailed the Guerrilla Girls’, and asked if they would grant me permission to use their 1986 Report Card. I received an email back the next day from Kathe Kollwitz (a pseudonym).

On Mar 6, 2015, at 4:50 AM, Guerrilla Girls  wrote:

Sure. Could you send an image of the painting when you finish it?

Best, Kathe Kollwitz for the Guerrilla Girls
________________________________

GUERRILLA GIRLS
www.guerrillagirls.com
www.facebook.com/guerrillagirls
www.twitter.com/guerrillagirls

Next, I emailed Pussy Galore. Initially, I heard back from Maura Reilly letting me know I needed to ask the collective itself. Within hours, I had received permission from the Feminist Art Collective to use the 2015 Pussy Galore report card.

On Mar 6, 2015, at 10:02 AM, Feminist Art Collective wrote:
Dear Carollyne,

We’d be delighted! Just be sure to credit us somewhere. And please send us a pic of the painting when you finish it–for our files.

thanks for thinking of us.

Best,

the PGs

I was very thrilled at this point. And grateful! Thank you to both the GGs’ and the PG’s.

My final concept blended the two report cards (Guerrilla Girls’ 1986 and Pussy Galore 2015), Gloria Steinem dressed as WW with gold bracelets flexing her gun muscles, the primary colours of the Wonder Woman Ms. Book (which I likened to the bold colours of the Guerrilla Girls’ posters), and the squirrel mask (by Archie McPhee) for anonymity. Even my favourite Star Global Advanced IT Corp. Ltd. and Carollyne Yardley Omnimedia logo = the five-pointed star was integrated, although it IS a Wonder Woman thing.

Guerrilla Girls In the News:

Guerilla Girls Birthday Party 30 Years and Still Counting
http://www.guerrillagirls.com/posters/2015guerrillagirls30thbirthday.shtml

The Guerilla Girls Are Still Relevant After All There Years
https://hyperallergic.com/199104/the-guerrilla-girls-are-still-relevant-after-all-these-years/

Pussy Galore in the News:

Art Collective Pussy Galore Shows NYCS Galleries Still Pretty Sexist
http://animalnewyork.com/2015/art-collective-pussy-galore-shows-nycs-galleries-still-pretty-sexist/

Pussy Galore’s 2015 Gallery Report Card is Out
http://artfcity.com/2015/02/19/pussy-galores-2015-gallery-report-card-is-out/

Reference

(4) http://www.guerrillagirls.com

Squirrel Mask by: Archie McPhee

SHE, Fazakas Gallery, Vancouver, BC | Artists Trace Yeomans, Carollyne Yardley, Rosa Quintana Lillo

MEDIA RELEASE

Media Contact: LaTiesha Fazakas at 604.876.2729 or info@fazakasgallery.com

Event: “SHE”
Opening Reception: Saturday May 23th 6pm – 8pm
Exhibition Dates: May 23th – June 20th
Venue: Fazakas Gallery, 145 West 6th Avenue, Vancouver
Gallery Hours: 11 am – 5 pm Tuesday to Saturday
Information: www.fazakasgallery.com

SHE

Is SHE there yet? How far has SHE come? How far does SHE need to go?

What does it mean to be a woman in our ever-changing social landscape? How do female artists perceive the impact of gender on their work, practice, and career?  Do they even want their gender to be a discussion point?

In the Fazakas Gallery’s newest show, SHE, three very diverse female artists Rosa Quintana, Carollyne Yardley, and Trace Yeomans come together for a visual discussion.

In terms of female history, much has been said, challenged, restated and rectified. Thanks to some stubborn, tenacious and brilliant women, art history specifically has been revised and forced to include them.
Female artists today have role models with which to identify and draw inspiration. Which begs the question, is SHE there yet? How far has SHE come? How far does SHE need to go?

This exhibition creates an opportunity for pointed questions from the audience, while providing an opportunity to view exceptional work by three talented artists who also happen to be women.

Featured Artists who will be featured in SHE include:

Trace Yeomans was born on Haida Gwaii to a Haida mother and a Ukrainian father. She has been an artist for most of her life, prompting her to pursue this passion throughout high school, and to acquire post-secondary training. Her passion has always been painting but she is also known for her beautiful Dance Regalia with appliqued Haida designs and fabric art techniques, some of which are displayed in museums around the world. (Images soon!)

Trace has frequently worked with her husband, Don Yeomans, combining their respective skills to create unique and critically acclaimed artwork, examples of which can be seen in her fabric art and paintings. She has also worked along side him painting and carving on several totem pole commissions, including the monumental poles in the rotunda of the Vancouver International Airport. Trace has explored many mediums during her art career but always circles back to her first love – oil painting.

Carollyne Yardley coined the term Squirrealism to describe her signature style of fine artwork using squirrel faces in paintings, photographs, and digital art to create strange, transgene characters and creatures, living in wonderful worlds.

Through the meticulous and minute brushwork of fine portraiture, Carollyne’s work incorporates allegory and surrealism to explore psychological truths and complexities about the human condition. Even without a human face, her paintings maintain the essence of a portrait, immediately conveying humour and personality — followed by budding uncertainty about the characters and the secrets they keep.

Carollyne Yardley has garnered all levels of press in Canada, featured in The Globe and Mail, The National Post, CTV News, CBC Radio, online weblogs, and the covers of several books and magazines.

Madonna and Bank Squirrel (birth of ideas), 24 x 36, oil on wood panel, 2015
Madonna and the Birth of Ideas was already in progress by the time the show theme was revealed. I think it works perfectly into the exhibition, however. The squirrel representing the birth of ideas is a direct reference to how Squirrealism was born from painting just one little squirrel. Read more.

Madonna and Bank Squirrel, 24 x 36, oil on wood panel, 2015

Madonna and Bank Squirrel, 24 x 36, oil on wood panel, 2015

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse, oil on wood panel, 60? x 40? (152.4 cm x 101.6 cm), 2015 

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse is complete. It is the introduction of a new character.  The imagery is the marriage of Mickey Mouse ears, and a Guy Fawkes mask, the later being a stylized depiction of Guy Fawkes,  the best-known member of the Gunpowder Plot. More recently the mask has been associated with the film V for Vendetta, the hacktivist group Anonymous, and had wider use in popular protests, such as the Occupy movement.
Read more.

Anonymouse detail of head

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse, 60 x 40, oil on wood panel, 2015. Detail of head

Guerrilla Squirrel, oil on wood panel, 40 x 40, 2015 (after Guerrilla Girls’ and Pussy Galore)
In order to remind myself of the WORD, I downloaded a copy of Gloria Steinem’s, Outrageous Acts, and Everyday Rebellions and re-read the Guerrilla Girls’, Beside Companion to the History of Western Art, and ART MUSEUM Activity Book. Happy 30th Anniversary to the Guerrilla Girls’! Read more.

Guerrilla Squirrel, oil on wood panel, 40 x 40, 2015 (after Guerrilla Girls' and Pussy Galore)

Guerrilla Squirrel, oil on wood panel, 40 x 40, 2015 (after Guerrilla Girls’ and Pussy Galore)

Male Figure Drawing Squirrel: What If You Couldn’t ‘Cause You’re A Girl?
When I was enrolled at the Visual Arts, Department of Fine Arts, University of Victoria to complete my undergrad, I didn’t fully appreciate the value and privilege of being able to participate in gender equal art classes. Specifically, drawing male nude models.  When I returned to fine art almost a decade later, I still took for granted that this inclusive training was forbidden to women 150 years ago. Read more.

Male Figure Drawing Squirrel: What If You Couldn't 'Cause You're A Girl? oil on wood panel, 24 x 36, 2015

Male Figure Drawing Squirrel: What If You Couldn’t ‘Cause You’re A Girl? oil on wood panel, 24 x 36, 2015

Rosa Quintana Lillo, was born in Santiago, Chile and grew up in Buenos Aires, Argentina. In 1977, after fleeing two military dictatorships, she and her family arrived in Toronto, Canada. She is a painter and sculptor working on private and public commissions in Agassiz and Vancouver studios. She attended the Toronto Art Centre where she received a solid technical foundation in the fine arts. Her current paintings deal with content out of context, extinct birds, graffiti, art history and surface texture experimentation.

Since 1989, she has worked for many Contemporary West Coast artists. Her primary work for these artists was the production of carvings, rubber moulds and castings in various materials. She has worked for the Vancouver Art Gallery as a painter on the Michael Lin Mural Project, Public Art Commissions, the Vancouver Film Industry as a sculptor and Props maker and as a sessional instructor at Emily Carr University and The Art Institute of Vancouver.   Her works are in collections in the UK, US, Canada and Mexico. (Images soon!)

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse, wearing ESCADA haute couture, darling.

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse, oil on wood panel, 60" x 40" (152.4 cm x 101.6 cm), by Carollyne Yardley

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse, oil on wood panel, 60″ x 40″ (152.4 cm x 101.6 cm), 2015 by Carollyne Yardley

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse is complete. It is the introduction of a new character.  The imagery is the marriage of Mickey Mouse ears, and a Guy Fawkes mask, the later being a stylized depiction of Guy Fawkes,  the best-known member of the Gunpowder Plot. More recently the mask has been associated with the film V for Vendetta, the hacktivist group Anonymous, and had wider use in popular protests, such as the Occupy movement.  This painting will be presented at a group show in Vancouver, BC at the Fazakas Gallery, May 23 – June 20, 2015. Opening night: Saturday, May 23rd, 6-8pm. More info will be posted at my website soon.

Anonymouse detail of head

Anonymouse detail of head (full painting is 60 x 40, oil on wood panel, 2015 by Carollyne Yardley)

Several of you will recognize the exquisite nature of the purple jacket. Well, dear fashionistas, you are correct. The gorgeous, purple, satin, and multi-coloured sequin ESCADA jacket seen in the painting, was on loan from the fabulous and elegant Susan Erling-Tyrell, Curator of the Costume Museum at Government House. This piece is from her personal collection.

Details of the ESCADA jacket:

The piece was from The ESCADA Collection of 1980 and a one of piece. The inspiration of this piece was from the art of Salvador Dali and it was designed by Margareta Ley who was the founder of ESCADA.  She was from Sweden and always designed in bright bold and daring themes, ahead of their time because as she said the winters were so long, and dreary and depressing, and that your clothes should always be very bright cheerful and happy to off set the gloom of long winter dark days. She moved to Munich, Germany where this piece was designed. Germany was the base country for all of the original ESCADA clothing.
Visit the company website for more.

Anonymouse detail left side jacket (full painting is 60 x 40, oil on board, 2015 by Carollyne Yardley).

Anonymouse detail left side jacket (full painting is 60 x 40, oil on wood panel, 2015 by Carollyne Yardley).

 

Anonymouse detail right hand (full painting is 60 x 40, oil on board, 2015 by Carollyne Yardley).

Anonymouse detail right hand (full painting is 60 x 40, oil on wood panel, 2015 by Carollyne Yardley).

I decided that because the jacket was circa 1980’s, I also wanted to present it as a piece of magazine advertising from the era. In keeping with many aesthetics of the day, the use of white space was often seen in clothing adverts for the United Colours of Benetton, Swatch, and Patrick Kelly to name a few.

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse, oil on wood panel, 60" x 40" (152.4 cm x 101.6 cm), by Carollyne Yardley

Full size of painting. The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse, oil on wood panel, 60″ x 40″ (152.4 cm x 101.6 cm), by Carollyne Yardley

 

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse (in progress), 60 x 40, Oil on wood panel.

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse (in progress), 60 x 40, Oil on wood panel.

 

Here are some behind the scenes pics capturing Secret Squirrel frolicking with the mask of Anonymouse.

Secret Squirrel and mask of Anonymouse, Photo by Jen Steele. Jan 2015.

Secret Squirrel and mask of Anonymouse.  Jan 2015. Photo by Jen Steele.

Secret Squirrel and mask of Anonymouse, Photo by Jen Steele. Jan 2015.

Secret Squirrel and mask of Anonymouse. Jan 2015. Photo by Jen Steele

Secret Squirrel and mask of Anonymouse. Jan 2015.

Secret Squirrel and mask of Anonymouse. Jan 2015. Photo by Jen Steele

 

Update:

Event: “SHE”
Opening Reception: Saturday May 23th 6pm – 8pm
Exhibition Dates: May 23th – June 20th
Venue: Fazakas Gallery, 145 West 6th Avenue, Vancouver
Gallery Hours: 11 am – 5 pm Tuesday to Saturday
Information: www.fazakasgallery.com

FULL SHOW DETAILS HERE

We tend to identify people based on their brand, or outward appearance. The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse challenges your first impressions based on visual cues. Our heuristic reasoning is powered by pattern recognition and association. When applied to social interaction, it makes us natural stereotypers. By replacing the human face with an Anonymous mask and Mickey Mouse ears, and adding a haute couture jacket, the viewer is forced to contemplate the personality of the entity within.

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse challenges the stereotype which  assumes that most efforts involved in the promotion and success of protests like the Occupy movement are exclusive to the 99%.

Additionally, as our privacy and personal details become more public, either through breaches in data security, or by self-posting our lives on social media, there is a new breed of privacy conscious media stars. While many already conspiracy theorists believe the world is being run by anonymous forces, there are literally thousands of individuals that perform world-wide known performances, but no one, or at least the public at large, is aware of who they are as individuals.

In the art world, for example, we have graffiti artists like Banksy, and activists like the Guerrilla Girls. Banksy is a pseudonymous English graffiti artist, political activist, film director, and painter and says, “As a kid I always dreamt of growing up to be a character in Robin Hood.” (4) The Guerrilla Girls, an anonymous collective of female artists and art-world professionals, describd themselves as “…feminist masked avengers in the tradition of anonymous do-gooders like Robin Hood…

These are just two examples of two groups of visual communicators who live in a state of disguised identity, with dreams of equality for all.

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse – painting in progress

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse (in progress), 60 x 40, Oil on wood panel.

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse (in progress), 60 x 40, Oil on wood panel.

The Celebrity of Being Anonymouse is my next painting, and is the introduction of a new character added to my œuvre d’art. I started this one last month. It is the marriage of Mickey Mouse ears, and a Guy Fawkes mask, the later being a stylized depiction of Guy Fawkes,  the best-known member of the Gunpowder Plot. More recently the mask has been associated with the film V for Vendetta, the hacktivist group Anonymous, and had wider use in popular protests, such as the Occupy movement.

The gorgeous purple satin and multi-colour sequin ESCADA jacket seen in the painting was on loan from the fabulous, and elegant Susan Erling-Tyrell, Curator of the Costume Museum at Government House. This wearable art is from her personal collection, and the design was inspired by artworks of Salvador Dali – featuring crescent moons, stars, and, of course, the all seeing EYE.
More on this later.

Here are some behind the scenes pics capturing Secret Squirrel frolicking with the mask of Anonymouse.

Secret Squirrel and mask of Anonymouse, Photo by Jen Steele. Jan 2015.

Secret Squirrel and mask of Anonymouse.  Jan 2015.

Secret Squirrel and mask of Anonymouse, Photo by Jen Steele. Jan 2015.

Secret Squirrel and mask of Anonymouse. Jan 2015.

Secret Squirrel and mask of Anonymouse. Jan 2015.

Secret Squirrel and mask of Anonymouse. Jan 2015.

 

Madonna and Bank of Squirrel (birth of ideas). New painting 2015.

Madonna and Bank Squirrel, 24 x 36, oil on wood panel, 2015

Madonna and Bank Squirrel (birth of ideas), 24 x 36, oil on wood panel, 2015

Introducing the first posted painting of 2015. Madonna and the birth of ideas, 24 x 36, oil on wood panel, 2015.

This painting came about from a photo shoot I did back in 2012. The concept was developed during the same session that I styled the imagery for Charlotte’s Web. The dress and veil came from my costume department, as did the lovely kitsch squirrel. He is actually a Chalkware Squirrel Coin Bank,  and I inherited him from my grandmother. She used to have many images of religion hanging on the walls of her home, and it seemed apropos that dear squirrel be immortalized in the manor of her interior decor. (Insert Wink). Perhaps I’ll do as well with my invention of Church of Squirrel.

Model: Jen Steele

Glorious Tree Hat: Silly Hats Only by Kaiser Alexander

Makeup: Jen Clark

Update:

Event: “SHE”
Opening Reception: Saturday May 23th 6pm – 8pm
Exhibition Dates: May 23th – June 20th
Venue: Fazakas Gallery, 145 West 6th Avenue, Vancouver
Gallery Hours: 11 am – 5 pm Tuesday to Saturday
Information: www.fazakasgallery.com

FULL SHOW DETAILS HERE:

Madonna and the Birth of Ideas was already in progress by the time the show theme was revealed. I think it works perfectly into the exhibition, however. The squirrel representing the birth of ideas is a direct reference to how Squirrealism was born from painting just one little squirrel. According to my career and vocation horoscope, ideas are the food of life for me. (1) Many mothers would exclaim that their children provide them with the same nourishment. Using the mother image, and central icons of both the Catholic and Orthodox churches, I have represented my version of “Mary” with her child “Jesus.” In this painting, Jesus has been replaced with the image of a chalkware coin bank squirrel from the 1960’s. The images of Jesus and Mary have been used for centuries to infuse worshippers with hope. Through carefully branded imagery, the church has gained both adoring worshippers, and money to build its infrastructure. The chalkware squirrel reminds us how the birth of ideas can also bring us hope, and uses humour to create a fresh  perspective. It also acknowledges the privilege of living a creative life.

(1) Career and Vocation, Personal Horoscope by Liz Green

Squirrels now available at Winchester Galleries Ltd. 2260 Oak Bay Avenue. #squirrealism #contemporary #canadian #art

I’m pleased to announce artworks now available at Winchester Galleries Ltd. 2260 Oak Bay Avenue. #squirrealism #contemporary #canadian #art

Winchester-Galleries-logo

 

Murakami Squirrel, 24 x 35, OIl on Wood Panel, 2013

Murakami Squirrel, 24 x 35, OIl on Wood Panel, 2013 – SOLD

 

Yayoi Kusama Squirrel, 24 x 36, oil on wood panel, 2013

Yayoi Kusama Squirrel, 24 x 36, oil on wood panel, 2013

Charlotte’s Web, 36 x 24, oil on board, 2012

With Joe Coffey at his opening at Winchester Gallery

With Joe Coffey at his opening at Winchester Gallery

10845735_10152915055474411_4313400495662860556_o

Yayoi Kusaqma Squirrel in the background at Winchester Galleries

IMG_1080

Carollyne with Charlotte’s Web at Winchester Galleries

 

Winchester Galleries
Website: www.winchestergalleriesltd.com
2260 Oak Bay Ave
Victoria, BC
(250) 595-2777

Robert Amos – Studio Visit and Exploring Japanese Prints Oct 2014

On October 31, 2014 – my husband and I were invited over to Robert and Sarah Amos’s house to look at art. We adore exploring different collections, especially discussing artworks with someone who is passionate about how the art is made, and the history surrounding a genre’s evolution.

Collaboration between Robert Amos and Kileasa Wong. Painted together, one of more than a hundred they have made since 1989.

Even better, is when the guided art tour is by an artist, author, and art historian whose own work is inspired by the collection at hand. While we looked at many different artists on this day, it seemed appropriate for the timing of this post to highlight the Japanese prints we viewed. Reason being, Robert recently wrote and published a column in the Times Colonist, showcasing an exhibit at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria – Shin Hanga: The New Print Movement of Early 20th Century Japan, (through Jan. 25). In the article, Robert describes how, “Japanese prints drew me to Victoria in the first place. In picture books, I’d seen The Great Wave, that famous print by Hokusai, and learned that the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria had Canada’s leading collection of art from Japan. Subsequently, I came to Victoria…”

Collaboration between Robert Amos and Kileasa Wong. Painted together, one of more than a hundred they have made since 1989.

During our visit, we poured over exquisite and colourful prints that were delicate and refined. Many captured a moment in time, while others spoke of hair-raising ghost stories that piqued our imaginations. We also viewed several of Robert’s finely textured watercolour collaborations with Kileasa Wong – created together – one of more than a hundred paintings they have made since 1989. Next, Robert opened a box that contained several pieces of AMOS brand, personalized signature seals, that he designed and hand carved from soft stone imported from China. Use of one of these seals can be seen stamped in red on the artwork titled, Tea Ceremony for Dollies (below). Robert painted this is in a temple courtyard in Osaka in 1981. It shows girls filling up plastic ups with sand.  Next, Robert showed us a landscape painting, illustrated with poems, and an accordion-style, landscape scroll painting, which depicts the camas flowers which bloom in the spring on Beacon Hill. (a format which also provides the true panorama experience of plein air painting).

To read more about Japanese art and poetry, and the new print movement of Japan, I’ve posted links to two books below, along with links to Shin Hanga: The New Print Movement of Early 20th Century Japan, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, until January 25, 2015. Hope you enjoy exploring Japanese prints as much we have!

AMOS brand personalized signature seals, designed and hand carved by Robert Amos. Made from soft stone imported from China.

Tea ceremony for dollies - Osaka 1981

Tea Ceremony for Dollies – Osaka 1981, by Robert Amos.

Landscape scroll illustrated with poem by Robert Amos.

 

Long Scroll Painting Book, 2010 by Robert Amos. Depicting the camas flowers which bloom in the spring on Beacon Hill

Cover of Long Scroll Painting Book by Gesshu

Inside of Long Scroll Painting Book by Gesshu

 

Kunisada: relaxing by a waterfall (scene from a kabuki play), circa 1840

Drawing his sword ca. 1850

Kunisada: a very expensive prostitute, late in the evening, seen in a mirror

Scene from a kabuki play – female impersonator ca. 1830

Robert Amos with Japanese prints

Chikanobu: maiden bound and gagged and thrown in the river, 1878.

Chikanobu: boy on a bridge defeats a badger, overseen by a ghost, 1878

Read more about Goblins, Ghosts, and Ghouls in Japanese prints in this photo essay at Hyperallergic. http://hyperallergic.com/158516/goblins-ghosts-and-ghouls-in-japanese-prints/

Shima Seien: ghost woman, ca. 1928 – a print by a female artist.

Again – we thoroughly enjoyed this exploration of Japanese prints, and are looking forward to learning more. In the meantime, I encourage everyone to visit  Shin Hanga: The New Print Movement of Early 20th Century Japan, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, until January 25, 2015.

Shin Hanga: The New Print Movement of Early 20th Century Japan, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, until January 25, 2015
1040 Moss St., 250-384-4171, aggv.bc.ca, through Jan. 25.

See more at: http://www.timescolonist.com/robert-amos-the-stylish-allure-of-japanese-prints-1.1588634#sthash.J3D09jQO.dpuf

Additional reading:

Haiku: Japanese Art and Poetry, Judith Patt et al, Pomegranate Communications, Petaluma, California, 2010, $29.95

Shin Hanga: The New Print Movement in Japan, Barry Till, Pomegranate Communications, Petaluma, California, 2007, $29.95.

 

VICTORIA’S POET LAUREATE LINDA ROGERS WROTE A POEM TO KIM KARDASHIAN’S BUTT ON MY FACEBOOK TIMELINE. #breaktheinternet

It started out with a simple Facebook post, sharing an article posted at Mashable on how the Internet had a field day Photoshopping Kim Kardashian’s butt from her “Paper Magazine” cover.

Then, there was a dare by my Facebook friend, Linda Rogers, to Photoshop Kim’s butt with my “almost famous” Bun Anus meme.

I rejected this dare, thinking of where my FACE would be if it were real. This hold out led Linda Rogers (Victoria’s poet laureate) to write a fabulous poem in honour of Kim Kardashian’s butt.

So, I relented and posted the Bun Anus meme.

Voila –  Kim Kardashian Butt Meme with Poem. It’s So Contemporary. Enjoy.

#breaktheinternet

Poem to Kim Kardashian’s Butt. Dangerous Suburbs, by Linda Rogers.

 

DANGEROUS SUBURBS by Linda Rogers van Krugel

What lovelier shapes than wind 
eroded sandstone, salt-washed 
rocks at tidelines, sun-ripened 
peaches on garden walls? They 
beg the appetite; as do famous 
for being famous badonkadonks 
oiled and photoshopped on our 
billboards and men’s magazines. 

Bite me, kiss my ass they 
seem to say, worship my 
whoopiecakes. The worm’s 
in the apple; the serpent’s 
alive and well, long after 
the first garden became 

dangerous suburbs for colonisation.

Bend over, they say, assume 
the position, as rows of little 
children line up to take down 
their pants, never again to 
experience such intimacy, the 
sting of the switch, the ephemeral 
erection, both sides mesmerized 
by the arc of the philosopher’s 
whip, anticipation of feeling. 

Such beautiful calligraphy, a disturbance 
of air, signatures infidels borrow from 
jihadi poets to send fatwas to gravity 
challenged dookies rattling like change. 

Shake your change, shake your money-maker. 
You can’t take it with you, neither ass nor assets,.

music that inspires dementia ladies,
juke boxes filled with nickels and dimes, 
to get up and dance, so they forget 
everything: the taste of peaches and sex, 
the fear of whips, everything but the 
sound of waves, wind eroding stone…

the safe parameters of lust.

 

Bun Anus meme with Kim Kardashian’s Butt.

Italian copies (forgeries?) of Marion Peck and Carollyne Yardley’s artwork. Good, bad, or flattered?

Occasionally, I Google my name to see if people who love my artwork talk about it, or post images online.  It gives me a chance to reblog, or retweet, and share the love.

A couple of days ago, I was searching online, and found there’s an Italian guy named Giuseppe Zappalà. He appears to be offering his original copy of Green Bun Squirrel, and at least three Marion Peck paintings, among others.

Text from the website under the heading Copie d’autore describes his offerings: http://gizah81.wix.com//restart#!copiedautore/ca4p
Riproduzione fedele di dipinti ad olio su tela e su tavola dal XVI sec. ai giorni nostri.

Translated:
Faithful reproduction oil paintings on canvas and wood from the sixteenth century. the present day.

I can’t quite tell if this is a test website, or if it’s for real? Was it a school project? Or? It does appear, however, that he has painted his own version of Green Bun Squirrel, seen posted here.
He’s given me credit for the original painting, which was nice. I’m quite flattered to be copied alongside the great pop surrealist Marion Peck, who has god-like status in my mind.  It makes such a discovery even more surreal.

Another perfect example of the importance of a registered trademark, and keeping documentation on paintings done from my studio.
FAKES ARE NOW OUT THERE, YOU”VE BEEN WARNED.

Screenshot 11/01/2014

Screenshot 11/01/2014. Copy of Green Bun by Giuseppe Zappala.

 

Original painting of Green Bun Squirrel by Carollyne Yardley, 14 x 20, oil on board, 2011.

Original Green Bun miniature by Carollyne Yardley, 4″ x 5″, oil on board, 2012.

 

Copy painted by Giuseppe Zappala of Boy with Dog

 

 

Girl with cat by Giuseppe Zappala

 

Original Marion Peck “Girl with a Kitten” Oil on canvas 2007

 

Painting by Giuseppe Zappala

 

Original painting by Marion Peck “Kittens” Oil on panel 12″ x 14″ 2003

Like a Princess (For Better or For Worse). Diana, Princess of Wales. Photo series.

Diana, Princess of Wales (July 01, 1961 – August 31, 1997).

I had planned to bring my Squirrel Mask to London to capture a few Squirrealism pics on the road.
But, I forgot. So I had to improvise. I found a post card of Princess Di.

Like a Princess (For Better or For Worse).

 

THE BEGINNING WAS FILLED WITH EXCITEMENT, AND MANY SECRETS.

THERE WERE PARTIES IN THE DAYTIME.

AND IN THE NIGHTTIME TOO.

WE’D ALL HEARD ABOUT PRINCE CHARMING.

AND THE PAPARAZZI ZOO

AS YOUR WORLD STAGE GREW AND GREW.

IT WAS HARD TO IGNORE YOUR THROWN SHOE.

AND IN THE END, IF THE PEAS DIDN’T GET YOU, THE CARROTS HAD PROMISED TO.

 

Inspiration

Early on, during our art adventure, I was taken with a painting by Adrian Ghenie, Golems (June 12 – July 26, 2014). The lead character, is wearing a 1940-1950’s flowery dress, a feminine hairstyle, and her face is a distorted, rearranged, screaming, melting, doubled, and mask like. This served as the basis of my photo series using a Princess Diana postcard.

Adrian Ghenie, Golems.

DETAIL